Tag: customer service

waiter serving young people in restaurant

In my previous article, I talked about how slow service can impact a restaurant’s bottom line (more than you think!). 51% of people surveyed by Consumer Reports (published August 2014) said slow service was their top gripe when it comes to eating out. So what can restaurants do to prevent annoyed customers, and increase the likelihood of them returning?

Make sure your staff is properly trained, and happy.

Restaurant diners want to be treated well, and restaurateurs want to keep guests returning. The truth is, it doesn’t matter how amazing your food is, or how beautiful your restaurant décor might be, if the overall customer experience doesn’t meet or exceed their expectations, there’s a good chance they won’t return. Customer experience touch points can cover different parts of a restaurant’s day-to-day operations, however, hiring and training the right staff is a big piece of the pie. Here are four tips for how your restaurant can stay on top of service:

    1. Be present Let’s face it, everyone has an off day every once in a while. Sometimes it doesn’t matter how stellar an employee is, or how well they’re trained…things happen. However, no restaurant owner, or restaurant GM, should assume they’re perfect. Yes, we’re all extremely busy EVERY DAY. But the difference between creating a positive customer experience, versus a negative one, can be as simple as being present and aware with what’s actually going on inside your four walls. Take a few minutes each week to listen to what people are saying, both inside the restaurant and online, about the service your restaurant provides. Get to know your customers. Find out what their needs are, and if you’re meeting them. If not, what can you do to improve? Briefly talk to them while they’re enjoying their meals, conduct surveys (you frequently see this advertised on the bottom of receipts), ask someone to be a secret diner, and pay attention to social media. Yelp and TripAdvisor reviews are helpful. Even better, set up your restaurant name as a Google Alert for more frequent chatter updates.
    2. Hire and train people smarter than you Take the time to hire the right people for the job initially, and adequately train your current employees. Consider letting go restaurant staff members that are holding you back. One Negative Nancy, or Corner Cutting Chris (I just made that up), can drag down your whole team. Create your “Dream Team.”
    3. Culture is King Great people attract great people. When developing your “Dream Team,” it’s critical to create an environment where everyone works together. Michael Jordan, as great as he was (Go Heels!), didn’t win the 1984 and 1992 Olympic games alone. Even though staff members work individually for tips, why can’t they also work together to help each other succeed? Taking a drink order, or filling the water glasses of a table nearby takes seconds and won’t diminish the level of service for their own tables. After all, there’s no “I” in team, remember?Ever heard the phrase “Monkey see, monkey do?” Employees follow the lead of their management team, so make sure you’re setting an example to follow. Listening is key. Give employees your full attention, keep them informed of restaurant goals and how you’re meeting them, and make all employees feel important by encouraging participation and paying attention to feedback and suggestions. Creating an atmosphere of support, cooperation, and positivity will benefit not only your employees, but your customers as well.
    4. Don’t hit the snooze button As a restaurant owner or manager, you’ve decided to listen to your customers, train your staff and develop a spirit of teamwork. Awesome! You can now go on a year-long vacation right? Wrong. When you plant seeds in your backyard you can’t expect them to grow on their own. You must water, fertilize, and pluck the weeds. Otherwise they may not develop the beautiful blooms or delicious vegetables you crave. Get my point? Be there, be aware and never be complacent.  Even if you have the greatest GM, or staff, in the world, don’t take things for granted. This is your creation and ultimately, your responsibility. If you want to go sit on the beach somewhere, pray you have enough in your 401k plan, develop your exit strategy and get the hell out of dodge. A non-existent owner or boss does nothing for employees but confuse them.

Just because we might have had that one bad experience at a restaurant, doesn’t necessarily mean we won’t return – but we would hope our next experience would be different. Remember happy customers become loyal customers. Loyal customers not only come back, but also want to shout to the world how great your restaurant is, which ultimately means a typical $50 check might turn into a $100 check if you play your cards right. How does your restaurant stay on top of service? What are you finding successful? Was there anything that you thought would work but took a dramatic turn? Let’s discuss! Tweet, FB, or comment below!

moneyoutwindow-2

I don’t know about you, but I hate losing money. Even if I were ultra-wealthy, I don’t think I’d ride down the road tossing $50 bills out the window. That would be crazy right? (Well, maybe not to the lucky ones who pick those bills up!)

But that’s exactly what I saw happen a couple of weeks ago: On a whim, my husband and I decided to meet up for lunch at the Brick House Tavern and Tap in Tampa (say that three times fast!).

We were looking for a good meal, and to have a beer in a fun and lively atmosphere. We’ve been there before and we’ve had good food, and better than average service.

My husband frequents Brick House more than I do, and although he’s experienced slow service in the past, neither of us imagined we’d experience a problem at 2pm on a weekday.

We were greeted right away at the door, and promptly seated at our booth, where we proceeded to sit… unrecognized… for 15 minutes. Servers were eagerly waiting on tables in front of us, behind us, at the bar, across the way, outside, you name it; while we sat memorizing the menu and dying of thirst.

After stopping two servers to see if they could find someone to help us, and continuing to wait (were we ignored? forgotten about?), we took our $50 and walked out the door.

And that, folks, is how slow service will make you lose $50 in 15 minutes.

Sure $50 in the grand scheme of things might not sound like a lot. I mean, don’t restaurants make thousands of dollars a day? Yes, some do, but consider this: if two tables were to walk out each day at $50 each time, we’re talking about $36,400 in lost revenue each year!

With an average profit margin of only 2-3.5%, restaurants need to  do everything they can to avoid throwing money out the door.

The August 2014 edition of Consumer Reports (already published), features a national survey titled “The Gripe-o-Meter”.  In that survey, 51% of those surveyed said “slow (or maybe non-existent) service” was their top gripe for restaurants.

51%! That’s over half the people they surveyed, who must have experienced something similar to us.

The good news is that there are ways that you can be on the right side of that statistic.  Check back next week for my next post that will give restaurant operators 4 ways to stay on top of their service.

In the meantime, what is your gripe? Are you one of the 51% or do you gripe about something else? We want to hear from you! Tweet, FB, or comment below!

You won’t drive sales by posting on Facebook. In order to have a successful restaurant social media presence, you’ve got to lay off the sales push and focus on your relationship with your customers. Sure, on the surface social is a great avenue to promote upcoming events, specials, deals, etc. But it goes beyond that.

Your absolute main focus should be customer service and the experience that you’re creating for customers online. You’d think that this would be obvious to professionals in the restaurant industry, but it’s not unlikely to see restaurants on Facebook sharing their “daily deal” and then disappearing… leaving customers with unanswered questions, concerns, and even compliments – I can’t take it any longer! So, I had to share what must have been a secret. 😉

If part of your restaurant marketing strategy is to post on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc., you’ve got to realize that getting word out there is just half of it; your response to those engaging customers is the other. Here are a few tips to keep in mind after that post gets blasted to the social media world.

  1. Acknowledge as many customers individually as you can. Whether it’s a “like” or a personal shout out, make them feel special and build that relationship! The stronger the relationship, the more likely they’ll think of you next time they’re looking for a restaurant to go to.
  2. Don’t let too much time pass. Let’s say you post a photo of one of your appetizers on special that night and a customer responds with a question and then no one replies… you just missed a huge opportunity to engage and influence that customer! (Example to the right is from the Green Lemon in Tampa.)
  3. Be human. Don’t be afraid to use “I” instead of “we” and let your personality come through. Customers will feel much more connected to you if they know a person is behind the scenes.
  4. Download social media applications so you don’t miss out on an opportunity! Facebook Pages, Twitter and Instagram all allow you to set up push notifications so you know what your customers are saying in real time.

Of course there is always the issue of time, but if you’re going to post, you better have a reaction plan in progress! If you cannot personally commit to looking after your restaurant’s social media presence, turn to a trusted employee or social media marketing professional.

And the thought I’ll leave you with tonight is… no one likes to be ignored, especially when it comes to an industry where customer service could make or break you. So, like your mama always said, “treat others the way you’d like to be treated!” and if yours truly could add to that… “this includes online!!”

Ciao!

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